• 21st Century Victory Gardens Benefit Today's Hungry - Monday, October 5, 2009 at

  • FOOD Share, Agromin encourage community to grow produce through Garden Share program, initiate call to action for neighborhoods to help feed our hungry.



    VENTURA, CALIF. (October 5, 2009--During WWI and WWII, growing Victory Gardens became a necessity to supplement community food supplies.

    Decades later, the idea of sustainable backyard and community gardens is again at the forefront. A program from FOOD Share, called Garden Share, is a new community-based effort that encourages neighborhoods to grow produce to help feed the hungry.

    FOOD Share and Agromin, the official sponsor of Garden Share, have made it fun and easy to get started through a free Garden Share member program that includes incentives, discounts on soil to start a garden, and how-to tips and support to get you started on the path to helping feed those in need.

    "Adding fresh, often organic, produce for our fellow food pantries to distribute is an amazing gift to people who so often go without," said Bonnie Weigel, FOOD Share CEO. "Whether you have a single container on the patio or a row in an acre of farmland, everyone can get involved to help with Garden Share."

    Agromin is one California's largest organics recyclers, diverting green materials collected from every community in Ventura County and converting them into more than 200 types of sustainable, eco-friendly soil products. It is offering its soil products at a special discount to volunteers who sign up to grow vegetables for Garden Share.

    "Agromin believes strongly that as a community we should help each other and help our environment," said Bill Camarillo, Agromin CEO. "Garden Share does both by feeding the hungry and by using soil made from locally-generated recycled green waste. Garden Share provides an opportunity for all of us to make a difference in the lives of our neighbors and to make the environment we live in cleaner and more sustainable."

    POUNDS FOR PRODUCE
    Agromin and FOOD Share will select winners of a Pounds for Produce contest based on the amount of produce grown in one of six categories: potatoes, tomatoes, celery, onions, broccoli, and citrus. The contest is free to enter and open to everyone through July 15, 2010. Top producers in each category will win free soil from Agromin on a pound-for-pound basis, equal to the total weight of produce donated to FOOD Share.

    GET GREEN AND GET GROWING!
    Get started with a free Garden Share membership that includes incentives, discounts on soil from Agromin, how-to tips, and support to help grow your garden. To sign up and become part of the FOOD Share family, visit www.foodshare.com or www.agromin.com.

    For more information, call Meg Horton at FOOD Share, (805) 983-7100, ext. 105.

    About FOOD Share
    A major food bank distributing millions of pounds of food annually to those in need throughout Ventura County, FOOD Share collects and receives food year-round, distributing to more than 150 partner agencies throughout Ventura County and serving over 41,000 friends through its Oxnard headquarters.

    Its Brown Bag and Snack Attack programs provide supplemental nutrition to about 2,200low income seniors through 31 agencies and healthy nutritious after school snacks to approximately 1,800 children though 12 agencies countywide and provides food to more than 40,000 people each month. Information: (805) 983-7100 or www.foodshare.com.

    About Agromin
    As a United States Composting Council Composter of the Year Award-winner, Agromin, headquartered in Oxnard, manufactures premium soil products for farmers, landscapers and consumers, and is a green waste recycler for more than 50 Southern California communities.

    Each month, Agromin receives and processes thousands of tons of urban wood and green waste. Agromin then uses a safe, organic and scientific system to formulate its soil products from the processed recycled green waste. The result is more vigorous and healthier plants and gardens, and on the conservation side, more room in landfills and less greenhouse gas emissions. For more information: www.agromin.com.

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